TGV-inhalonix to Present New Findings on Breakthrough Drug at Biotech Showcase Conference

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NEW YORK, NY – 12/8/2016 (PRESS RELEASE JET) –TGV-inhalonix, a New York-based pharmaceutical company with a consistent track record in developing anti-infective agents, announced an upcoming new report on its most advanced novel drug candidate – MUL-1867. The new study results will be presented at The 9th Annual Biotech Showcase Conference in San Francisco, January 9-11 2017.

As one of prominent presenters at the prestigious industry gathering, TGV-inhalonix will expand on its successful development of Mul-1867, which for the first time in many years of research proved to be effective against multidrug-resistant bacteria that cause cystic fibrosis.  Mul-1867 has been consistently showing promising efficacy in studies.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration earlier this year granted Mul-1867 Orphan Drug Designation, which points to unmet medical need in further development of the drug and could allow Mul-1867 to enter the pharmaceutical market in the near future.

“We are ready to share with the expert community the exciting new results that we obtained from working with Mul-1867.  It is the first drug candidate that holds promise against resistant strains of bacteria and infections caused by a mix of bacteria and fungi that plague cystic fibrosis patients,” said George Tetz, scientific and development advisor at TGV-inhalonix.

TGV-inhalonix’ scientific core – George and Victor Tets – are regular speakers at world’s largest CF and biotech conferences.  The 9th Annual Biotech Showcase is one of the main international events of the upcoming year with over 1,600 participating companies and representatives of over 40 countries.  Since its launch in 2009, the conference has allowed hundreds of companies to advance their innovative biotech products through investor funding and bring them to the market at record pace.

Mul-1867 was developed to treat cystic fibrosis – a hereditary disease that causes the body to produce thick and sticky mucus that clog the lungs and obstruct the pancreas. This genetic disease can be life threatening and affects an estimated 30,000 children and adults in the US.  Over 10 million Americans are carriers of the cystic fibrosis gene.  The average life span for people with CF who live to adulthood is about 37 years.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently granted Mul-1867 Orphan Drug Designation based on indications of its potential for fighting lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This special status is intended to provide incentives for the development of drugs and biologics to treat rare diseases.